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On-Set Etiquette

You have been scouring the Internet in search of opportunities for a first job in the film or TV industry. You have been applying for many of them and finally, it happened. You got that email, the job is yours.

Landing your first on-set job in film or TV is a very exciting time. However, how to behave, what to do, what to say and even what to wear might be some of the questions going through your mind. Hopefully this article will point you in the right direction and put you at ease so you can go off to a wonderful first day.

Chances are your first job will be that of a runner-like role, be it camera, floor or otherwise. If for some reason this is not your case, I’d like to encourage you to read on as you might still find the rest of the article very useful. There are things stated below that might sound very obvious, however they don’t always come across as such.

General behaviour

Being as helpful as possible is a no-brainer, but you should also be aware that sometimes too much assistance can be considered interfering. Sometimes we want to be so helpful that we get in the way of other people, which is evidently not well-regarded. Along the same lines, you should only speak when you are spoken to. Don’t try to look or sound smart by demonstrating your skills and just focus on completing the tasks you are given. One thing to keep in mind is that a production always runs against the clock so everyone is always very busy doing their part and no one has time to waste.

Be proactive about offering help if you don’t have anything to do at a given time and never do something you haven’t been asked to do or touch anything you haven’t been asked to touch. Conversely, always ask about things if there’s something you don’t understand or if you are not sure about how to do something. It is much better to ask again and get it right than not asking and getting it wrong. If you do make a mistake anyway, apologise, try to find a solution for it and move on.

It’s also very important to always be jolly, polite, respectful and never complain. Shooting days can be very long (sometimes even 12 or 16 hours) and occur during the so-called “unsociable” hours. Therefore, you will normally spend a very long time working with the same people. This can be great if people get along but also uncomfortable if you have to put up with someone unpleasant for so long. For this reason, many would go so far as to say that they’d rather work with someone nice that doesn’t know as much than someone who is a tech wizard but not likeable.

The same goes for complaining. You will get tired and possibly hungry and thirsty. In any case, keep it to yourself and never complain. No one likes a whiner.

Nevertheless, don’t think that you have to do everything you are asked to without question. For instance, if you are told to go buy lunch with your own money and they will reimburse you later, it’s okay for you to politely decline if you don’t feel comfortable doing it. There might be reasons why the company hasn’t sorted out some of the meals, however it is not included in the runners’ duties to financially take charge of this.

Also, don’t attempt to lift anything that looks too heavy for you just because you have been told to do so. It’s perfectly fine for you to state that a determined load is too heavy for you and ask for help.

In the same way, it’s okay to admit you don’t know something if you’re asked for technical advice or told to do something beyond your knowledge or that you have never done before. The important thing here is to not try to “save the day”, especially if you are going to go about something by guessing. Again, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Along these lines, never overestimate your skills by suggesting that you are able to do something beyond your duties. For example, if you are a camera runner, don’t walk up to a camera assistant and ask if you can pull focus on the next take. Anything like this would be considered very rude, even if you can pull focus.

Productions are organised in a very hierarchical way. Always be respectful of everyone but especially more so the heads of department and talent. Try not to be nervous around talent, they are normal people too and are pretty much in the same boat. If you know who someone is without having met them before, don’t talk to them unless you have to or if they approach you.

What to wear and carry

The dress code may vary from production to production, but it will be usually indicated on the call sheet if there is one. Take the weather into account, especially if you are going to be working outdoors. Since weather can be unpredictable (particularly in the UK) it’s a safe bet to wear a waterproof jacket and shoes. The latter should be as comfortable as possible, so a pair of nondescript trainers would probably be a good call. Also think in terms of temperature, you don’t want to spend the whole day shivering or sweating.

In regards to the rest of your attire, a normal pair of jeans or trousers and a basic t-shirt should do the trick. Tracksuits can be a grey area, but it would be safe to say that most of the times they will be considered as “too casual/comfortable”. Just make sure that the clothes you’ve chosen are not noisy when you move.

In terms of colours, you can never really go wrong with dark clothes –except for maybe those occasional hot days in the summer.  However, don’t wear light or bright clothes as these cause reflections on the actors, scene, or sometimes in windows.  The plainer, the better, and it is best to avoid wearing big logos. This can cause some trouble depending on the nature of the production, so best to make sure this is alright or avoid it altogether.

A torchlight can be very useful – the one on your phone should be alright but remember to silence it! – and if you want to be extra helpful always carry a couple of Sharpies and pens, even some blank paper sheets and some gaffer tape.

What to expect

You have to be aware that “runner” is the lowest of the roles in a production. This isn’t anything bad, it’s just a matter of hierarchy. Don’t be offended if someone explains something to you that you already know, just listen and learn. Practice makes perfect, so hearing about something one more time can never be a bad thing.

As a runner you won’t be (shouldn’t be) treated any differently. However, you might find yourself having to carry out what might seem like menial tasks, such as breakfast/lunch runs, making tea and coffee, fetching objects or water and conveying messages. Again, this is not a bad thing. There is always something to learn from everything and completing allegedly easy and boring tasks in a timely manner with efficiency and a good disposition will eventually get you noticed as a hard-working, reliable and pleasant individual, which can earn you good references that will lead to roles with more responsibility in the future.

Another excellent skill to have on set is the ability to remain calm when something goes wrong –it will happen, more than you would think. In these situations, people get nervous and stressed and therefore you can expect to be yelled at as a result of high stress. If this happens don’t take it to heart, just carry on with your tasks and be as helpful as possible. However, if by any chance you had a truly unpleasant encounter with anyone that shouldn’t be ignored, leave it for the end of the day and make sure to report it to the head of department.

In terms of food, it depends on the arrangements that have been done for the day. You can expect at least one catered meal and complimentary water throughout the day.

In terms of working time, as I stated before you should expect to work long hours and to have some breaks during the course of the day. How many will depend on the intensity of the work and the schedule.

Last but definitely not least, you should always get paid for your work, unless it’s clearly stated beforehand that the role is not paid but you still decide to do it. Unpaid jobs however, are luckily becoming more of a rarity. In any case, always go on a job having clarified compensation matters beforehand.

Do’s and Don’ts

Here is a list of some additional do’s and don’ts that can help you on set:

  • Be polite, respectful, pleasant and helpful.
  • Never sit down unless you are on a break. In this case, make sure to stay away from the set and any busy areas.
  • Don’t carry copies of your latest script/film to show people, especially not to heads of department or the director, producer, etc.
  • Don’t ask for anyone to let you do anything beyond your duties/capabilities.
  • Never brag about your past work and preferably don’t mention it unless you are specifically asked about it.
  • Always keep receipts if you buy anything, whether it’s for yourself, the production or someone else.
  • Never give your opinion about the work that is being done unless you are asked to. If this is the case, always start with something like: “I’m not sure, what do you think?”
  • Use your common sense.

The Festival Run

Finishing a film is always a great accomplishment. It is very rewarding to see an idea come to fruition through the coordinated effort of people working in team to achieve the representation of that idea. However, the last step to make that effort complete is to show the results of the hard work. And as if making the film wasn’t hard enough, showing it is likely almost as difficult, if not tougher. It is all very nice showing it to family and friends, but that won’t exactly yield any sort of professional recognition or prospects of career progression.

So, who should I show my film to and how? – you might be wondering. The answer is “festivals”.

What are film festivals?

Film festivals are events that provide the opportunity to showcase new talent and productions in the film industry. They are also great places to do business, network, stay head about new developments and even learn new things through Q&A sessions and workshops.

Simply put, a festival can be thought about as a film market. Filmmakers submit their films looking to catch the eye of people working in the industry. Executives, producers, directors, actors, distributors, press, critics, agents and many others attend to look for new productions, new deals in terms of rights, ideas or distribution agreements, opportunities to collaborate and uncover new talent.

Generally, it is possible to also attend festivals even if you don’t work in the industry or if your submission hasn’t been selected. You can buy tickets for most of them, however the more popular and prestigious, the more expensive and difficult it would be to get a pass. This can be nonetheless worth doing for big festivals, since these are a very interesting window to peak through to see how films are actually bought and sold. It is also a great experience and you never know who you can end up meeting.

Reasons to enter them

The main reason for filmmakers to enter festivals is therefore to get exposure. No one is going to come looking for you or your film, especially if they don’t even know you exist and make films. This is tied-in with trying to win awards, another reason to enter festivals. These are the main places to do so –even cash prizes- and this normally translates into recognition and press attention. Depending on the prestige and popularity of the festival, there can be high career development prospects – like getting on the radar for big productions or projects, or maybe having new opportunities for higher funding. Awards also look great on any personal filmography, and you might want to consider listing them on your CV since this could provide you with a boost that takes you to the next level.

Even if you don’t win any awards, most would consider getting accepted into any category of any respected festival, a great success. You can still get recognition and press attention just for being selected – and there could be as many prospects if your film appeals to the audience even though not so much to the jury.

Process

The process for the festival run starts by planning it right at the pre-production stage. In my previous article “Starting Pre-Production” I mentioned providing an allocation for festivals when preparing the film’s budget. This budget would be for submission fees, as most festivals are not free to enter, and in most cases, for preparing a submission package.

In order to get an accurate figure about how much to spend in festival submissions, it is necessary to carry out research that determines which festivals you are going to submit your film to. Knowing exactly this will save you a lot of time, money, effort and disappointment in comparison to just winging it.

Bear in mind the time that it will take to complete your film, not to overlay it with any deadlines. If you are thinking of submitting a film that is already finished, you don’t need to worry about this –however, you will need to check festival’s guidelines to see that your film is not too old to be submitted. Normally festivals have several deadlines: early bird, regular, late and sometimes extended. It might be an understatement, but the later you submit, the more expensive the fees will be, therefore you would want to aim for the early bird deadline especially if you are concerned about saving some money.

The next thing to do, as I mentioned above, is create a package to present your film when submitting – a requirement in many festivals. This would normally include a synopsis that talks about the film and its meaning, as well as a Director’s statement (you can check out this article on how to write one: The Director’s Statement: What to Write). You would also need to talk about the team, their aspirations and motives and what they have done so far previous to your film, especially about key roles such as Director, Writer, Producer or DOP and the main cast. You would also want to consider spending some of the budget for this package in still photographs both from the film and production, a poster of the film (or a few) and even some marketing and promotion efforts and distribution plans.

The last thing is applying and forgetting about it. This is where blunt honesty comes into play: it is very difficult to win at festivals, but not impossible. It might sound very bleak, but the safest –and healthiest- tactic to follow is not to expect to win or to even be considered. However, if it does happen, the reward is immense.

It may seem like a lot of effort for nothing in most cases, but the only certain way not to win anything is never submitting. You’ve got nothing to lose – you should consider your festival budget allocation as a loss if you hadn’t done that yet.

What festivals should I submit to?

Yes, there is nothing to lose, but no one said you cannot play it smart and possibly stack more odds in your favour. The way to do this is to be truly honest with yourself about your film, especially in terms of the end result and its level. By doing so and researching festivals, you will find that there will be festivals of the same level of your film, where it will be most suited. This way, you will definitely increase your chances at winning.

So don’t be discouraged if your film isn’t at a professional level or the level you wanted it to be – there’s nothing wrong with this since there will still be festivals out for there for you.

Another tactic is to browse festivals by genre – some festivals are broad and others are specialised. If your film is a particular genre, like sci-fi or horror, you will find that there are many dedicated festivals where your chances of winning might be greater. This also includes student or independent festivals.

Opposite to that, there are broad, very prestigious and popular festivals like Cannes or Sundance where it is almost impossible to be considered – for starters you most likely need to know someone in there to even have your film looked at and have a shot at being within the 0.74% acceptance rate. My recommendation is not to bother entering very famous festivals at first, but best of luck if you decide to!

So, how to research for festivals?

There are great websites like FilmFreeway, Withoutabox, Reelport or Shortfilmdepot where you can browse for festivals and apply directly – some will in fact, only let you apply through these websites.

A word of warning to conclude, make sure to include as part of your research some time to verify the legitimacy of festivals. An accurate rule of thumb is to check the festival’s website – see if it doesn’t look weird – the number of editions the festival has run for – the higher, the better. It is especially questionable if it is running for the first time – that it is organised by a trusted and reputed organization and even the location. Believe it or not, scammers also target festivals aiming to get hold of enthusiastic filmmakers’ money by setting up “festivals” which end up taking place in their living room or in the middle of nowhere!

From Shorts to Features: An Interview with Chris and Ben Blaine

Chris and Ben Blaine (also known as The Blaine Brothers) are an award winning English writer-director duo who have garnered much praise for their short films and sketches for Film Four and the BBC. In 2015, they released their debut feature film, Nina Forever– a darkly comic, twisted and genre defying tale of love, death and un-dead exes.

Ben and Chris recently spoke at the ‘Shorts to Features: Journey of the Award -Winning ‘Nina Forever’ event hosted by IMIS on Monday 25th of September to talk about the transition from short film to feature film and the journey of their first feature from conception to premiering at SXSW.

I caught up with Chris for a chat following IMIS’s event:

 

LD: So, you’re professionally known as The Blaine Brothers, yourself and Ben, as film making siblings who write and direct all your projects together. Could you tell us a bit about how this came to be? When did you start the collaboration?

CB: We obviously used to play together a lot, but then I fell in love with animation and wanted to do some animation. Ben was always writing from a really early age and I was always doing art. So, I bought a camera to do animation and Ben had written a script with his mate Keith and said ‘Do you want to make this film with us?’ We spent the whole summer holiday making a feature length version of the Bible, like a piss take. But you know we’d not actually ever watched Monty Python’s Life of Brian at that point and there were jokes in there that were quite similar and obviously there’s a little bit of animation from me to complete it. But yeah, we had a good time arsing around in the woods with our school friends and putting on fake beards and playing around with fake blood and gore and doing stupid jokes. We sold it to the kids at school and it got banned by the school for being blasphemous which was great because it meant that it was something that everybody wanted because the school said they shouldn’t have it and we actually sold a lot more copies. We thought this is easy, we can make money from this! So, we started making short films and didn’t make any money from those for a very long time.

 

LD: Quite ambitious beginnings then!

CB: Well, sort of, it was just arsing around with a VHS camcorder. We didn’t have any idea about film making or where to place the camera or anything like that and we slowly learnt that by making short film after short film.

 

LD: So, moving on to screenwriting. What would you say are the benefits of having a writing partner?

CB: Well the enemy so often is the blank page and when there are two of you it’s a lot easier to not face yourself with a blank page because it might not be that you’re writing but you’re always talking. One of you is going to be helping the other one think through exactly what it is that you are trying to do. So, we rarely have the writers’ block thing that most have to struggle with and that I do terribly if I’m on my own. But together certainly it is a real joy.

 

LD: Does it present any challenges that you didn’t expect?

CB: It did early on. Ben always did the writing and I was always doing the camera work. Then I’d written a script for the first time and by swapping those roles it suddenly became really clear that we weren’t necessarily making the same film when we were shooting it. In one film, there was one character that one of us thought was alive and one of us thought was dead and was a ghost. But we didn’t figure that out until the edit and one of us was sitting there going ‘Sorry, you think what?’ We’d both been intending to make a completely different film, that was actually a good step to find that out and to start properly interrogating each other. And that film then Ben started to really rip apart as a script and we hugely improved it and rewrote it and reshot it as a short. Then after that it was kind of no holds barred, we were always just ready to rip into each other and try and make stuff better but mainly to be going ‘What is it that you’re actually trying to do?’ rather than what it says on the page. So often with a script the intention is actually not in the scene so it can be easy to misread the intention of what that particular scene, or what the film as a whole is trying to say. You can go off on tangents really easily so we just always keep talking about what it is we’re trying to do so when you’re writing it comes out from that.

 

LD: How do the two of you set about co-writing a script, do you have a specific method that you use or is it a bit more spontaneous?

CB: It’s a fairly regular routine of ideally writing every day but basically we share a screen so we’ve got two laptops but they’re both seeing the same thing. We write in Scrivener which is an application which has organisation so you can do each scene as its own little card and you can put those scenes within a folder for a sequence and you can put that sequence as a folder of an act so you can get the structure of your film and see it really clearly and write a whole bunch of notes. Usually when we’re writing we will talk and write notes and figure out what it is we’re supposed to be writing. We usually beat out a film using Scrivener and taking a while to actually get into writing it on the page because so often when you put a thing on the page you get really attached to the formulation of the words. That can be a really delightful thing but it can also be really that it doesn’t matter the way that those words are put together because an actor will come along and do it in a certain way and is it actually getting to the point of the intention of the scene, it can really get in the way. A lot of the time now we take a while to get around to writing and have talked it through so much that it becomes quicker to write and is a lot more liquid and fluid and easier to keep changing it.

 

LD: 2015 saw the release of your debut feature ‘Nina Forever’. What did you find you find where the challenges of going from writing short scripts to your first feature script?

CB: Definitely not our first feature script! Ben had been writing them since god knows when. I started writing features not long after I started writing short films and Ben had already written some by that point. The biggest thing for us with Nina was that we got to the point that we’d been writing films and slowly but surely trying harder and harder to fit in the model that everybody expects of 3 acts and a down point here, that sort of stuff. It kind of kept taking the life out of the scripts that we were writing as we don’t naturally write in 3 acts, it just doesn’t really fit us. With Nina we basically just went ‘f*** it’- we’re not going to write in a genre, we’re not going to try and write anything that we expect anyone will like, we’re just going to write for ourselves. Literally the weirdest, darkest s**t we could think of that felt right and was making us laugh was all going in there. We fully expected the script to horrify most people in terms of them wanting to work with us because up to that point pretty much all the short films we’d been making were comedies and Nina is blackly comic but isn’t really a comedy and it’s quite horrific in many ways. We were kind of expecting people to say ‘Don’t make that movie! Why? Why would you do that?’ which was almost the point. In terms of the difference between the shorts and the features, a short always feels like you’re trying to express a single idea really simply and perfectly and a lot of the time it either comes out all in one go and it works or you keep going back to it and reworking it to the point that you’re not sure that it does what you want it to. With features it is all about the reworking of it. We always find it hard with a short, you feel like either it comes out and you’re like ‘yeah let’s do it’ or you get into development hell. It’s weird, it’s almost easier to get into development hell on a short film than it is on a feature, I guess because it’s so few words to be talking about compared to a feature where there is so much that you are able to change. I suppose a lot of that is the juxtaposition of one scene after another, as soon as you just move some scenes that’s changed the whole film, with a short you’ve probably only got about 3 scenes. You don’t have as many options available in order to see how it can work, it either does or it doesn’t.

 

LD: Bearing in mind the quite shocking subject matter, did you find that that made securing funding for the film quite difficult? Did people not really understand what genre you were trying to place yourselves in?

CB: Our attention was always that we were never going to go to the industry with it. We raised money privately, we’d actually saved up some money ourselves. We were doing editing for tv- working all hours means that we’re not spending the money so we had this chunk of money in the account and we thought ok we can use that to make the film and we can maybe double it and go and make it with as many friendly people as possible and with as small a crew as possible. The producer that we work with Cassandra (Sigsgaard) said she thought we could make it a slightly bigger movie using FDA scheme. So, we went to a lot of different people to raise the money but it actually came together quite quickly. I think if we’d gone to the usual industry sources we probably would’ve gotten ourselves stuck in the quagmire of ‘yeah but what genre is it?’ and all of those usual questions that you get. Because we were avoiding it we just got to talk to people who either really believed in us as film makers and were willing to come on board due to that or they actually read the script and because there was a real honesty to it and a real freshness to it, because it is a really different film, they could see how it could be a cool, interesting movie. So, we didn’t fall into those pitfalls and the money came together really quickly.

 

LD: Did you find that by getting financing by other means other than fully funding it yourself that anyone wanted to make any adjustments to the script or change the kind of vision you had for it?

When Cassandra came on board she gave us a bunch of notes and we definitely re-wrote with those in mind but it was still very much the film that we’d wanted to write. The biggest thing for her that sells us as film makers is our voice, so she was really on point in terms of going ‘yeah that doesn’t really feel like you guys’ and actually a lot of the time was pushing us to be weirder which was fun. We were really quick in going into shooting it and possibly could’ve developed it for longer but actually I think that’s part of the reason why we raised the money quickly because we were basically just set on the idea of ‘yup we’re going to go ahead and make this and we’re going to shoot it for whatever money we’ve raised and you can either be a part of it or you don’t have to be a part of it.’ We weren’t really beholden to anyone which was a really liberating feeling. But then in the edit we definitely got some feedback from our execs and they weren’t ordering us to do anything, they were very much like, ‘these are my thoughts but it’s entirely up to you’. It was actually really nice and again, they were actually encouraging us to go further and be more daring with what we were doing, so it was really positive.

 

LD: So, what advice would you give to film makers who perhaps have experience making their own shorts but are finding it difficult to progress from that onto making a feature film? 

If you can think of something that you can make really small as a feature film and to be able to do it with no pressure, go do it! It’s the tricky thing of ‘you’re not a feature film maker until you’ve made a feature film’ you’ve always got that catch 22. So, Nina Forever for us was 3 people in a bedroom, and ok, there’s the two parents so there’s a little bit of stuff around their house but essentially we were thinking it’s kind of just two locations, it ended up being like 26. We were thinking this could be a really simple film, it’s something we could shoot on a DSLR, and it could just be me and Ben- I can do camera, he can do sound and just the 3 actors. It just felt like the kind of film we were totally ready to go and make and felt perfect for us at the time. When we were starting out and writing it we were thinking we were going to be making this for 20 grand, and it doesn’t matter if we fail miserably and if the film doesn’t work it’s just a chance for us to try and make something, and make something longer and learn all the stuff from that. That no pressure way of making a film can be really good because you can really get the pressure put on you as soon as you start getting money involved. A lot of the time you want your film making to feel free and to not have that pressure. There are so many good films being made now for pretty much f*** all. Actually, it’s almost like the film funders are waiting for you to make a film for not very much because they want you to prove that you can do a full-length feature. So, the starting point is no longer making a short for a certain amount of money, it’s making a feature film for nothing, following the Ben Wheatley kind of model. There is a real freedom in being able to do that and just going ahead and making something. There are feature films that people are making on iPhones that are winning awards and getting into Sundance. So, you can shoot on anything now and it looks great. So, you’re not going ‘we need to afford 35m film’, it’s more ‘Na I just need to edit it on my laptop- oh, I’ve already got that. I’ve already got some sort of a camera, away we go.’ But I think that’s kind of the way we always try to think about it- it’s just trying to be film makers so just making and not waiting and asking for permission.

 

Events

Time Is Money: Production Coordinator Crash Course

Come join us as production coordinator Georgina Bobb will present the importance of having a production coordinator join your team for any project. Similar to an orchestra, everyone plays their role but without the conductor everything sounds weird or just doesn’t happen.

She will:

  • Give an overview what being a production coordinator entails and the responsibilities on a day-to-day basis for a factual production
  • Give an insight as to which skills are required to become a great coordinator
  • How to apply for coordinator roles, tips on what to put in a CV and cover letter when applying for roles
  • Talk about her experiences on the job as well as her work for Connect 2TV Coaching

About Georgina Bobb:

Within her 13 years experience she has worked as a Junior Production Manager, Production Coordinator, Production Secretary, Post Production Secretary, Production Assistant, Logger, Junior Researcher, Archive Researcher and Runner in Television creating international and UK based content across all television genres. She has also Directed, Produced and Production Managed various Music Promos, Live Events and Commercials that have been broadcasted internationally as well as being screened online.

She has worked with various mainstream celebrities & artists as well as accumulating over 50 TV broadcasting credits working on prime time entertainment and factual entertainment productions for various broadcasters and independent production companies such as BBC & ITV.

Whilst working in television she has created and developed a TV-specific employability business, Connect2TVCoaching providing clients with CV and cover letter writing consultations and mentoring as well as employability workshops, training and networking events. She has received great feedback in which clients have gained interviews and paid work placements at companies such as the BBC, Lime Pictures, Love Productions and other independent production companies as a result. A Ravensbourne Graduate in Content Creation and Broadcast & from a non-traditional background she is passionate about specifically engaging and empowering disadvantaged young people enabling them to develop both personally and professionally giving them the opportunity to gain paid employment within the industry. Qualified with a Level 3 Award in Education and Training she has delivered TV and Media specific employability workshops through Connect2TVCoaching.

One of Georgina’s treasured moments in her career thus far includes receiving her first award nomination under the category of Rising Talent at the Screen Nation Awards – a ceremony that celebrates diversity within film and television. In 2019 I worked as a Production Coordinator on a programme called Operation Live, The Open Heart Surgery: Uncut which has also been shortlisted under Live Event at the BAFTA’s.  She has also been nominated as a Rising Star at the We Are The City awards a ceremony for professional women.

Selling Your Feature Film: Using a Proof of Concept

Come join us as writer/director Dwayne Gumbs will present the importance of having a proof of concept in order to sell your feature film script to investors. He will screen ‘Holy Beef’, a proof of concept for his feature film currently in development.

‘Holy Beef’ was funded through Film London’s London Calling scheme and was in official selection at the BFI London Film Festival 2018 and the London Short Film Festival 2019. As such, the project has also been supported by Film London as part of their Microwave scheme for first time feature filmmakers.

Dwayne will:

  • Talk about when and why the proof of concept became vital to his feature project
  • Give an idea of how to create a feasible and engaging a ‘short version’ of a substantial feature idea
  • Share his experiences of the benefits the proof of concept has brought with it and what it means for the future of his project

Come along to this gem of an event, meet new people and get some insight into the ins and outs of the journey from proof of concept to feature production.

About Dwayne Gumbs:

Dwayne’s passion for writing found an outlet as a child through Grime. Having grown up in East London when the culture was emerging, his hobbies included MCing, DJing and music production – a connection he’s maintained to this day. In 2008 he founded Diverse Voices Entertainment, a unique entity for young people to express themselves and access opportunities in the arts which would otherwise not be available to them. He has written and directed many live shows and short films, all co-created with these young people.

Dwayne collaborated with Iain Simpson on the Film London funded grime comedy short ‘Holy Beef’, a proof of concept for a feature in development, ‘Running Out of Grime’, which was also developed through Film London’s Microwave scheme.

Dwayne is passionate about creating positive depictions of a young generation too often portrayed negatively on screen. Whilst the London film industry is definitely broadening the range of stories being told, he still feels there is an unaddressed gap in the ‘Urban Film’ market, which is not a fair representation of the vibrant and positive inner city London life he experienced growing up, nor the true nature of today’s youth.

A Star Is Born: How to Find the Perfect Cast for Your Film

UNFORTUNATELY OUR GUEST SPEAKER HAS HAD TO POSTPONE, WE ARE LOOKING AT REARRANGING THIS EVENT IN THE FUTURE. WE WILL KEEP YOU POSTED!  THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE.

 

Come join us as Hannah Williams, Casting Director and U.K. Casting Specialist at Backstage, will talk about one of the most crucial steps in the film production process, casting for your film. She has worked on projects such as Fantastic Beasts, Tarzan, The Falling, Beast, etc.

She will:

  • explain the role of the Casting Director
  • walk you through the casting process of low and high budget productions
  • address the best ways for filmmakers in getting the perfect talent
  • talk about do’s and don’ts for filmmakers and actors whilst auditioning

Come along to this gem of an event, meet new people and get some insight into the world of casting.

About Hannah Williams

Hannah Marie Williams has been working in the business of casting for over 8 years, working on big budget features, indie shorts, commercials, TV, documentary and everything in between. She is now launching the UK arm of Backstage, a long established and highly regarded actor publication and casting platform from the US whilst also continuing her work as a Casting Director.

About Backstage:

For over 50 years, Backstage has been the most trusted place for actors and performers to find jobs and career advice, and for casting professionals and talent seekers to find the right performers for their projects.

Today, Backstage is the largest online casting platform in the United States, with over 4,000 roles posted every week, and over 100,000 members building their careers on the platform.

Casting professionals can take advantage of sophisticated application management tools to make the job of finding the perfect performer a breeze.

Networking&Drinks&Shorts

CALL FOR ENTRIES! FREE TO SUBMIT!

Join us as we celebrate short film of any narrative, structure and genre.

And as a perk, a full free year of membership will be given to a member of the crew of each of the films selected for the screening.

Everybody starts little, but by no means small. We are showcasing a range of exciting, quirky and inspiring short films made by passionate people. Talent can be reflected in so many was, let’s bring it to the screen.  Even if you don’t have a short to show, we would invite you to come and network with other filmmakers!

Submit your film today and come join us at our networking event. Watch works from fellow professionals, meet peers, chat, exchange details, collaborate and most of all, have fun!

How to Submit Your Short Film:

  1. Click ‘Order Now’ and select ‘Film Submission’ ticket.
  2.  Visit: https://www.societyinmotion.com/networking-drinks-shorts-submission/ to submit your short.
  3. Keep an eye on your inbox to see if it’s been accepted.

Rules for Short Film Submission:

  1. You must register for a ticket (see above) & be in attendance on the evening of the event.
  2. Your short film must be 15 minutes or less in length.
  3. You must possess the right to show the film.
  4. Submission does not guarantee that it will be shown on the evening. You will be contacted if you are selected either way beforehand.
  5. A full free year membership will be awarded to one crew member of each selected short film
  6. SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 19th October 2018, 5pm BST

Journey To The Oscars: From Concept To The Awards

Come join us as producer Cass Pennant will talk about his experiences bringing his film to become Oscar short-listed. He will:

  • give insight into what paved his way to the Oscars
  • talk about his colourful life and vast career stretching over six decades
  • present and screen his short racial drama Beverley (2015) which made the Oscar short-list in 2017

Cass Pennant has also consulted on several popular British movies such as:

  • Alan Clarke’s The Firm
  • Guy Ritchie’s Snatch
  • Lexi Alexander’s Green Street.

Come along to this gem of an event, meet new people and get some insight into the ins and outs of successful short filmmaking.

About Beverley:

‘Beverly’ was short-listed for the Oscar Nomination for Short Action Drama in 2017. The short racial-conflict drama was also screened in over 100 festivals and theaters all around the world and has won an outstanding 36 awards, including Best Short Film at the UK National Film Awards 2017.

Beverley (Premise):

Beverley is about a mixed-race teen on a white suburban estate. The local gang have completely different ideas about what she has to offer and her fight to fit in leads to devastating consequences.

About Cass Pennant and Urban Edge Films:

Black British born Independent filmmaker Cass Pennant is a former ‘Barnardo’s boy’ in the late 1950s whose own incredible story was turned into the British cult film CASS directed by Jon S. Baird in 2008.

With his founding of Urban Edge Films in 2010 he has taken further strides with his film work developing ideas, which are innovative and surprising in their approach. Pennant marked his filmmaker credentials when taking the ‘Best Film’ award for his feature documentary on the 80s football fashion subculture Casuals (2011) at the Portobello Film Festival in 2012 becoming a TV broadcast in 2013 on the Community Channel before purchased as a UK Netflix release in 2016.

He co-produced, working with director Gabe Turner (In the Hands of the Gods, The Class of ’92), violent thriller The Guvnors (2014) Rizzle Kicks’ star Harley Sylvester marked his feature film debut co-starring with actor Doug Allen. Premiere screened at Edinburgh Film Festival and won Best Action Movie at the 2015 National Film Awards.

His short film Beverley (2015) has been screened in more than 100 festivals and theaters all over the world. It was “short-listed” for the 2017 Oscar Nomination for Short Action Drama and has won thirty-six awards, including a Best of Fest Award from the St Louis International Film Festival. This work was also winner of Best Short Film at the UK National Film Awards 2017. Cass traveled extensively with the film, leading discussions at anti-racism festivals and at universities, and community groups.

As well as a freelance filmmaker, writer, interviewer, speaker and media consultant he is also a patron for the British Urban Film Festival.

About IMIS

The International Moving Image Society’s (IMIS) aim is to inspire, train, educate, and connect all members of the moving image industry, whether at entry or professional level, around the world. We accomplish this by putting on networking events,

Networking&Drinks&LGBT Shorts

CALL FOR ENTRIES! FREE TO SUBMIT! Join us as we celebrate LGBT filmmakers and their exciting short films of any narrative, structure and genre. And as a perk, a full free year of membership will be given to a member of the crew of each of the films selected for the screening.

Over the past decades, filmmakers have amazed the world with the development of a grand range of fantastic short films with LGBT focus. In this exclusive screening, we celebrate narratives of every genre influenced by LGBT subjects matters and members of the LGBT community.

Submit your film today and come join us at one of our regular networking events. Watch works from fellow professionals, meet peers, chat, exchange details, collaborate and most of all, have fun!

 

How to Submit Your Short Film:

  1. Click ‘Order Now’ and select ‘Film Submission’ ticket.
  2.  Visit: https://www.societyinmotion.com/networkingdrinkslgbt-short-film-submission/ to submit your short.
  3. Keep an eye on your inbox to see if it’s been accepted.

Rules for Short Film Submission:

  1. You must register for a ticket (see above) & be in attendance on the evening of the event.
  2. Your short film must have an LGBT-theme or you as a member of the crew identify as LGBT.
  3. Your short film must be 15 minutes or less in length.
  4. You must possess the right to show the film.
  5. Submission does not guarantee that it will be shown on the evening. You will be contacted either way beforehand.
  6. A full free year membership will be awarded to one crew member of each selected short film
  7. SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 9th July, 5pm

Networking&Drinks&Music Videos

Music video production is an exciting field. Submit your music video today and come join us at one of our regular networking events. Watch works from fellow professionals, meet peers, chat, exchange details, collaborate and most of all, have fun!

 

How to Submit Your Music Video:

  1. Select ticket and click ‘Order Now’ (see below).
  2. Pay for your ticket if you’re not a member.
  3.  Visit: https://www.societyinmotion.com/networkingdrinksmusic-videos-music-video-submission/ to submit your Music Video
  4. Keep an eye on your inbox to see if it’s been accepted.

Rules for Music Video Submission:

  1. You must register for a ticket (see above) & be in attendance on the evening of the event.
  2. Your music video must be 6 minutes or less in length.
  3. You must possess the right to show the film.
  4. Submission does not guarantee that it will be shown on the evening. You will be contacted either way beforehand.

 

About IMIS

The International Moving Image Society’s (IMIS) aim is to inspire, train, educate, and connect all members of the moving image industry, whether at entry or professional level, around the world. We accomplish this by putting on networking events,