Posts

Reflections on Running a Screenplay Competition

I am proud to have facilitated the Screenwriting Community within IMIS for the last year.

This Community was set up to offer something powerful for Screenwriters, with a focus on skills and opportunities.

It has become clear to me over this time how much this initiative is needed, particularly as an alternative hub to current big-hitters such as the BFI and BAFTA. How does a Screenwriter with little or no connections – but with a really original well-written project – breakthrough? Our purpose is to tackle that question head on.

Screenwriters have to navigate a mass of “opportunities,” many of which have strong brand recognition, that offer hope – but little else. A profit-making cottage industry of middlemen have come to dominate the space and this is why I feel non-profits such as IMIS can really make their presence felt and start to facilitate exciting writers, scripts and projects.

In an industry and culture that has yet to fall out of love with reboots, remakes and franchises – “copyright exploitation” to give it its technical, somewhat sinister, term – we aim to identify, and provide platforms for, the truly original voices of the future, with a singular passion. We want to spark a new golden age of British Cinema, which is why @IMISWriters uses the hashtag #britishfilmrenaissance

In the last year, the Screenwriting Community has hosted events led by Leah Middleton, agent at Marjacq, Rick Harvey, MA Course Director at Raindance, workshopping theme and others. We always aim to give Screenwriters practical tools to advance their writing and career, while eschewing hollow platitudes.

The Table Read Event was a continuation of that purpose and was meant to provide a platform for and feedback to a select number of promising scripts with an unerring focus on encouraging originality and driving excellence in the craft side of screenwriting.

With “craft” in mind, I also want to provide some general feedback to everyone on some of the major trends which cropped up from the 70 entries we received.

(And by the way, as a Screenwriter, I’m sure I have made all of these mistakes and many more, besides!)

What to Do and What Not to Do:

Format

This was undoubtedly the most noticeable issue.

A mandatory industry standard layout has evolved, the purpose of which is to help the reader focus on the story elements of each script consistently. It dictates, for example, that the font be 12-point Courier, with a whole set of very specific rules around spacing, indents and elements.

As there is an important reason for this format, my recommendation is simple – write in industry standard always. To help you in this, use software such as Final Draft or Celtx so you minimise the chance of any errors. Your individuality should be in the story, not the layout.

Rules

Not story rules, but screenplay rules. A series of ‘best practice’ conventions have sprung up around writing a screenplay, which, if not followed, can be equally distracting for the reader. A few examples:

Passive vs Active Voice

Screenplays should be written in “Active Voice,” where the subject is the person that performs an action, usually in present tense. This is the most immediate way of writing – important, because screenplays rely more on action and less on description than other mediums.

Passive Voice version: He is slapped by her.

A reader reads that sentence “he IS slappED BY HER” – this formulation JOLTs the reader out of the spell you are casting.

Active Voice version: She slaps him.

As a general rule, avoid the verb ‘to be’ and -ing words as much as you can.

Believe me, you can tell a professional-standard script from this alone, in the first few sentences.

Action Description

As a general rule, you only describe what the viewer can see and hear, because of the nature of the medium. Some writers wrote, “she feels” or “he remembers.” There is no way we can know what someone “feels” unless you describe the physical effect of that, or what he “remembers,” unless you include a flashback, or they talk about it, or it otherwise produces an observable physical effect.

Character Intro

First time is in CAPS. Again, you cannot describe their personality directly, you can only describe what we can see and hear. And what is seen and heard should mainly be that which indicates the kind of character they are.

Someone who fidgets may indicate a nervous person. This will also create a useful Active Question – in the audience’s head – why is this person fidgeting? Let’s find out…

“We”

This is a particular bugbear of Robert McKee’s and once you notice it, it, again, becomes a distraction for the reader. When you write “we see” or “we hear” in the action description, you put the reader in the story, you break the “fourth wall.” Find another way, don’t break the spell.

Titles

Maybe this is my personal taste, but I love clever titles, specifically ones which have a double meaning, one of which relates to some kind of theme. If a script is called “Penny” because it is about a protagonist called “Penny,” this usually does not bode well, unless “penny” also relates to some kind of story, let’s say about money or luck. But there are notable exceptions to this in the film world, such as “Carrie,”. Like I say, this could be my personal taste.

Story

Of course, there are all sorts of rules, conventions, principles and theories about how to write the story part of the screenplay, too. This is much more subjective, so all I have to say about this is in the scripts I read, where there was a sense of surprise – a great twist, or an intrinsically poetic approach, or dialogue pregnant with subtext it pushed a script to the top of the pile. This is where you can subvert audience expectation and/or cast a magical spell.

Summary

In order for the spell to stay, the format and conventions need to be adhered to dogmatically. This is so that it is in the story itself that you set your voice free and take us on a journey that will move us emotionally and transport us to another realm.

It was a pleasure to read these scripts and I hope that we run another event such as this one, soon. We want to make London a global centre of excellence for Screenwriting. #britishfilmrenaissance. Join us.

The Event

On February the 21st at Zero One, Soho we hosted a table read of the winning scripts, which enjoyed a very positive reaction from the audience and the participants. Bringing together quality writers and actors is only one stage in the process, but we hope to have facilitated the future production of these scripts into stunningly realised projects. The winners again:

  1. No Man’s Land by Tom Canning
  2. The Big One by Michael Lavers
  3. The Pact by Olu Alakija
  4. Psalm of the Sawist by Asia Nichols
  5. The Talk by Jonathan Hughes

Our sincere thanks also to the Actors who came down and brought these scripts to life and to Zero One for their support.

Advisory Council 2017 Nomination Reminder

IMIS will be holding an election for members to the Advisory Council this summer and we invite all eligible members to nominate other members to serve the membership. The rules of who can nominate and vote are listed in the link below.

Nominations are due by Monday, 22nd May 2017 at 17:00 BST.

The BKSTS Relaunches as the International Moving Image Society

London, UK, 7 November 2016

The British Kinematograph Sound and Television Society (BKSTS) is celebrating its 85th anniversary by rebranding and relaunching itself as the International Moving Image Society (IMIS).  The Society has seen the evolving nature of the industry and has decided this new brand is better aligned to address current changes in the industry as well as future developments.

The Society is not only looking towards encompassing traditional formats like feature films, television, short films, commercials, and music promos but also non-traditional formats such as virtual reality, interactive mediums, gaming, mobile video, web series and more.

In addition, the Society has laid out it’s aims to inspire, train, educate, and connect all members of the industry, whether at entry or professional level, around the world.  The Society plans on accomplishing this through its new website www.societyinmotion.com where it will develop original content for every phase of development from conception, through production, and all the way through exhibition and archiving.  Further, the Society plans to offer new seminars and events open to members and the public, training courses, opportunities for online and in-person networking, and expand its accreditation programme.  The Society aims on building a strong alliance with other societies, guilds and associations, both in the UK and around the world, in order to fulfil its mission.

The Society is best known for its series of monthly lectures covering all aspects of the industry ranging from technical to creative.  The Society has also had a rich history of providing wall charts that illustrate best-management practices for areas of the industry as well as technical resources.  The Society is a partner to Cinema Technology Magazine with members who regularly contribute to the publication.

 

About the BKSTS

The BKSTS is a non-profit member-based organisation that was formed in the late 1920s as the ‘London Branch’ of the Society of Motion Picture Engineers (now known as SMPTE) until 1930 when it split to form its own organisation.  In 1931 the Society began by accrediting the London Polytechnic (now the University of Westminster) in 1932.  It has grown and evolved over time to meet the changes of the industry such as the shift from employment to freelancing as well as film to digital.  It is in this respect that the Society has decided to evolve itself again into the International Moving Image Society.  The Society has members in over 20 countries and plans to expand its base to many more.

Events

Designing the Future: Winning A-List Work & Designing For VFX with Blockbuster Directors

DESIGNING THE FUTURE – WINNING A-LIST WORK & DESIGNING FOR VFX WITH BLOCKBUSTER DIRECTORS

EVENT DETAILS

Come join us as Founder and Executive Creative Director of Territory Studio David Sheldon-Hicks will present: Designing The Future – Winning A-list Work & Designing For VFX With Blockbuster Directors.

Sheldon-Hicks will demonstrate the lifecycle of a project through the lens of Blade Runner 2049 (d. Denis Villeneuve) and Ready Player One (d. Steven Spielberg), while delving into:

  • Pitching
  • Working with Art Departments
  • Production
  • Post Production
  • Working with Directors Denis Villeneuve and Steven Spielberg

Sheldon-Hicks will also discuss the impact of immersive and experiential technology on moving image exhibition.

ABOUT DAVID SHELDON-HICKS:

With a background in graphic design, David’s career began in digital media before moving on to the fast-moving world of music videos, where his passion for the craft and creative of motion graphics led him to film, games and commercial campaigns.

As founder and Executive Creative Director of Territory Studio, David’s love of storytelling and technology, and eye for emotive details has established a reputation for beautifully crafted, design-led graphic narratives across genres and media.

Today, David’s multidisciplinary team thrives on future vision challenges, attracting diverse briefs across entertainment, brand, installations and emerging technology.

In recognition of the studio’s creative approach and achievements, David was named as one of 2018’s Creative Leaders 50, an annual scheme from Creative Review that recognises outstanding talent across UK and Europe.

In addition to winning Motion Awards and D&AD’s, the studio’s work for Blade Runner 2049 has been nominated for the annual Beazley Designs of the Year 2018.

Studio credits include motion graphics and visual effects for feature films, including Avengers: Infinity War, Ready Player One, Pacific Rim Uprising, Blade Runner 2049, Ghost In The Shell, The Martian, Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ex_Machina, Guardians of the Galaxy, Jupiter Ascending, Zero Dark Thirty, Prometheus, etc.

Games work includes Sony VR Worlds, Horizon: Zero Dawn, Forza Motorsport 5&6, Need for Speed, Killzone Mercenery, Killzone 3, Medal of Honor, Little Big Planet, etc.

Attracted by Territory’s multidisciplinary approach, the studio has delivered technology and product visualisations, branded content and installations for clients including 007 Elements, Amazon UK, Avatar XPRIZE, Barbican Centre, Facebook, Faraday Futures, HSBC, Formula 1, Investec, Jaguar,  Land Rover, Microsoft, Santander, Sony, Spyscape Museum, Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Cruises, Volvo, and many more.

An inspiring speaker, David shares his thoughts and experiences at international creative and industry events including Motion Plus Design Paris; Dept Festival Amsterdam; D&AD Festival, London; Clerkenwell Design Week, London; FITC Amsterdam; Playground Festival, Eindhoven; OFFF London; OFFF Barcelona; Digital Shoreditch, and many others.

About Territory Studio:

Territory Studio is a creative specialist with a unique approach to motion graphics. Drawing on deep expertise of narrative design for film, we blend creative with technology to realise compelling future facing designs, from concept through to delivery.

Working across diverse projects from features films and episodic formats, the team’s passion for story and designer’s eye for problem solving informs the studio’s approach to art department and visual effects briefs.

With growing studios in London and San Francisco, Territory’s film credits include Avengers: Endgame & Infinity War, Ready Player One, Blade Runner 2049, Ghost in the Shell, The Martian, Guardians of the Galaxy, Ex_Machina, Zero Dark Thirty, Prometheus, and more.

BECTU Freelancers’ Fair 2019

Come join us at our booth at the annual Freelancers’ Fair 2019 and celebrate all freelancers in film and TV. BECTU is offering workshops and seminars, insurance, income protection and CV advice.  The event is free to all BECTU Members & £13.31 to non-BECTU Members.  Details can be found below and tickets can be booked here.

Seminars

09:45 -11:00 – Seminar 1 – Commissioning Live!

Seize the opportunity to hear from commissioners and development producers working
across a variety of genres. What factors inform commissioning decisions and how should
you prepare your pitch? Guest speakers will be announced shortly.

09:45 – 11:00 – Seminar 2 – Radical Film: Community and Collective Film-making

Three film-makers discuss issues of authorship, skill-sharing and alternative models
of film-making and distribution. Doc Society gives tips on how to successfully pitch
your idea to them. Panellists include Ed Webb-Ingall (film-maker/London Community
Video Archive), Beverley Bennett (film-maker), Taylor Le Melle (currently setting up
Not/Nowhere film-makers’ co-op) and Lisa Marie Russo (Doc Society).

11:15-12:30 – Seminar 3 – Drones: the Shots, the Gear, the Rules

What can you really do with a drone? Which drone is best for the job? And why even
hire a drone pilot when you can just stick one in the sky, right? Elliott Corke from Aerial
Academy (aka Drone Training) leads an aerial action masterclass with advice and insights
from some of the best drone cinematographers in the business: Carys Kaiser (The Drone
Lass), Helena Kardova (Monocle) and Dani Rose (Flying Pictures).

11:15-12:30 – Seminar 4 – The good, the Bad and the Exploited: How to Select the Best Training Opportunities

How do you spot worthwhile courses or training opportunities? How can you access funds
to help you up the career ladder? What is the industry doing to improve access to training
for those from more diverse backgrounds? Our speakers will include Gilly Cohen (Indie
Training Fund), Femi Kolade (LFS), Alex Pumfrey (Film & TV Charity) and Jon Wardle
(NFTS). The session will be chaired by Rachel Bennett, the union’s training officer.

13:00 – 14:00 – Seminar 5 – Tax Talk on Making Tax Digital with FreeAgent

The UK tax system is going through a huge modernisation and the transition is already
underway. If you’re VAT registered and turn over £85K plus, you’re already required to file
your return under the new MTD regime. And It won’t be long before small Ltd companies
and sole traders will be required to work under the new MTD requirements too. Join
FreeAgent’s Matt Perkins to learn more about MTD, when it will affect you and what
you need to do to comply.

14:15 – 15:30 – Seminar 6 – Production in your Pocket: Making Films on Your Mobile

With Steven Soderbergh’s High Flying Bird the latest feature to be shot on iPhones,
what does this alternative means of recording moving images have to offer the lowbudget
film-maker? Join the debate with our panellists Dierdre Mulcahy freelance
lecturer and Owen Holdaway reporter.

14:15 – 15:30 – Seminar 7 – Cut! Content, Carbon Emissions and Climate Change

How do we respond creatively to climate change, one of the biggest global challenges of
our time and put care for the planet at the centre of our productions? Roser Canela-Mas,
BAFTA’s industry sustainability manager will be amongst our guest speakers.

15:45 – 17:00 – Seminar 8 – Looting People: Navigating the Online Collaborative World

With young keen graduates the most prized resource in TV and film, and with gender
and BAME pay gaps still on everyone’s lips, is it ever right to ask teams to work together
without pay? And when are online platforms simply taking advantage of the enthusiasm
of developing talent? Consider these issues with Elliot Grove (Raindance), Simone
Pennant MBE (The TV Collective) and Jude Winstanley (The Unitlist).

15:45 – 17:00 – Seminar 9 – With Inequality Still Real How Do Diverse Film-Makers Succeed?

Screen International recently published a list of the top 50 production companies in the
UK. Only one company has a ‘person of colour’ as a development executive and most have
never worked with a female director. However, despite the odds, diverse film-makers do
make their mark. Join our invited guests to find out how.

17:00 – 17:30 – Writers Producers & Directors Branch AGM

Join us to find out more about the branch committee’s dynamic work and how you can
get involved. Members of the branch who are keen to join the committee should contact
organising official Jane Perry jperry@bectu.org.uk

17:00 – 18:00 – Networking Social

Always a great way to end the day!

Workshops

There are four workshops being offered:

09:30 – 12:00 – Freelance Toolkit with David Thomas Media

This session is for freelancers keen to develop their business skills. Whether you’re new to self-employment or more
established, this session will tackle financial control, getting paid on time, pain-free record-keeping and adapting to the
HMRC’s digital tax transformation. Maximum 16 people.

11:00 – 13:30 – Storytelling for Business

With film and high end TV delivering more than £91.6 billion a year to the UK economy (figure published 2018) it has
become even more difficult to gain access. Getting to the right people: cast, crew and finance, takes skills of true
persuasion. Actor/director and trainer Michelle Brooks uses tried and trusted theatre techniques and 5 Act story
structure in this part-theory, part-practical workshop to help you to present yourself and your projects with presence,
banishing nerves and giving you the edge. Maximum 25 people.

14:00 – 16:00 – Networking Dos & Don’ts with David Thomas Media

This workshop is for anyone who finds networking difficult or who doubts its importance. Learn how to leave the right
impression without being a pain, and why face-to-face networking is just as important as anything you do online.
Maximum 25 people.

14:30 – 16:30 – Using Social Video to Grow Your Audience

With the rise of social video and the ever-changing creative formats audiences swipe through on their phones, there’s
never been a greater opportunity to tell your story, nor a greater challenge in cutting through the noise to grow your
audience. In this two hour workshop, led by Tom Szekeres digital consultant and enterpreneur, you’ll discuss adopting
a social-first mindset in the current digital landscape; you’ll reimagine what a film/TV trailer should look like, and how
it should fit into a larger creative campaign. Be part of this session to explore a range of creative formats and digital
storytelling tools and techniques to bring to life your creative vision. Maximum 20 people.

 

About the BECTU Freelancers’ Fair:

It’s a day to come together to learn, to discuss and to enjoy. Programmed by leading representatives of BECTU’s Writers Producers and Directors branch, the event helps freelancers to connect and to enhance their careers. Come alone, or in a group, you’ll be in good company.

Whether you’re just starting out, or more experienced, our mix of topical seminars and practical workshops, backed by an extraordinary exhibitor line-up and technical area, will deliver real benefit to you.

How will you spend your day? Full programme info can be found here www.bectu.org.uk/freelancers-fair including confirmed speakers.

 

Out Loud – The IMIS Screenplay Table Read

Come join us at our exciting new event which features a table read of short screenplays and extracts from our second table read contest!

Selected for Table Read:

Misapprehended – Dorcas Agbogun

2 Shrugs and a Hug – Rasheka Christie

The Sun Will Set – Kevin McCarthy

Flesh and Blood – James Murphy

Reflection – Nick Padmore

Sweet Spot – Yoav Rosenberg

Spatium – Devin Tupper

 

Why Should You Come?

  • Identify flaws in your own work in the read-through
  • Get and give valuable constructive feedback
  • Sharpen your screencraft skills
  • Support your colleague’s work
  • Be inspired by storytelling
  • Network and meet other screenwriters, producers, directors and filmmakers!

Tickets Available:

  1. This is a FREE event to anyone who would like to attend so please invite your friends!

Annual General Meeting 2019

It’s this time of year again… The BKSTS CIC AGM for 2019 is on the way. We set out to provide our members with information of the progress our Society made this past year as well as exciting news and plans for the future.

All members in good standing are encouraged to attend.

About the AGM:

Items to be discussed:

  • Annual Accounts for 2018
  • Minutes of the 2018 AGM
  • Agendas for the 2019 AGM and Reports

As our Society has gone through significant changes during in 2018, we urge you to attend the AGM. Refreshments will be served from 6:30pm, and the meeting will start promptly at 7:00pm.

Please book a place through our website as it will assist us with the catering arrangements and allowing your entry through the front-desk security.

 

How to find the 01 Zero One:

01 Zero One is located near two underground stations: Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus.

From Oxford Circus Underground Station:

Walk East along Oxford Street and turn right when you arrive at Poland Street. Walk until Poland Street deadends and turn left on Broadwick Street and then than a quick right on Hopkins Street. 01 Zero One is located on Hopkins Street at the corner of Peter Street.

From Piccadilly Circus Underground Station:

Walk Northeast along Shaftesbury Avenue and turn left on Great Windmill Street. Turn right on Brewer Street and then left on Green’s Court. Take a slight right on Peter Street and then left on Hopkins Street. 01 Zero One is located on Hopkins Street at the corner of Peter Street.

The location is close to the centre of London and travelling by car is not recommended.

 

Getting Down To Business: Developing a Film Project That Gets Made

Come join us as film and TV producer Zack Winfield will present on the key skillset every producer needs: how to develop a film that is actually produced.

He will take you through:

  • Working with a screenwriter to develop a compelling, attractive script with a realistic budget.
  • Development and deployment of tools to attract investment to your project, such as sizzle reels.
  • Co-ordination between different departments to enable the final film to be delivered.

About Zack Winfield:

In 2003 Zack joined the production team at NDF International, one of the UK’s most successful independent production & financing companies with sixteen Oscar nominations to its credit, working across a wide range of NDF’s development projects including Franco Zeffirelli’s ‘The Florentines’. In 2006 He was Associate Producer (and Music Supervisor) on ill-fated UK-SP-JP coproduction ‘Guantanamero’. (dir. Vicente Penarrocha, c. Derek Jacobi and Natalia Verbeke).

In 2012 together with Ado Yoshizaki and Ben Friedman, Zack formed Native State. Recent productions include British action thriller Last Passenger (d. Omid Nooshin), was released in 35 territories in 2014; City of Tiny Lights (d. Pete Travis) starring Riz Ahmed which premiered at Toronto International Film Festival and London Film Festival in 2016 and was released in the UK in April 2017. In 2017 Zack was a production consultant on ‘Showdogs’ a family film for Open Road / Global Road.

Zack is currently working across a slate of film and tv projects, with partners in the UK and the US, is an independent consultant for various film companies, and also mentors on the Raindance Masters programme.

Hot Topics and Work in Progress 2019

Our annual Hot Topics and Work in Progress Accreditation Event is back for 2019! Come Join us.

This gem of an event is held at BFI Southbank where our colleagues from HE at our accredited University courses give an insight into current ‘Hot Topics’ roaming the industry and share the news from their campuses as well as show some of the recent work.

This year’s speaker will be creative director at Flavourworks, Jack Attridge.

Jack will be talking about the convergence between traditional film making and computer games followed by a Q&A where he will share tips about finding employment in the emerging media industry.

About Jack Attridge and Flavourworks:
After graduating from a Film Production degree, Jack worked for games studios including EA, Rebellion, Mind Candy and 22cans. Flavourworks have recently announced the release of Erica, their feature length, interactive game developed for the PS4 with Sony.This is a great opportunity to see selections of work from our accredited courses and to meet with young emerging talent starting out.

NO TICKETS NECESSARY. ALL IMIS AND INDUSTRY GUESTS ARE WELCOME!

FREE TO ATTEND FOR EVERYONE

We are very excited to see you there and we hope you enjoy yourselves!

Time Is Money: Production Coordinator Crash Course

Come join us as production coordinator Georgina Bobb will present the importance of having a production coordinator join your team for any project. Similar to an orchestra, everyone plays their role but without the conductor everything sounds weird or just doesn’t happen.

She will:

  • Give an overview what being a production coordinator entails and the responsibilities on a day-to-day basis for a factual production
  • Give an insight as to which skills are required to become a great coordinator
  • How to apply for coordinator roles, tips on what to put in a CV and cover letter when applying for roles
  • Talk about her experiences on the job as well as her work for Connect 2TV Coaching

About Georgina Bobb:

Within her 13 years experience she has worked as a Junior Production Manager, Production Coordinator, Production Secretary, Post Production Secretary, Production Assistant, Logger, Junior Researcher, Archive Researcher and Runner in Television creating international and UK based content across all television genres. She has also Directed, Produced and Production Managed various Music Promos, Live Events and Commercials that have been broadcasted internationally as well as being screened online.

She has worked with various mainstream celebrities & artists as well as accumulating over 50 TV broadcasting credits working on prime time entertainment and factual entertainment productions for various broadcasters and independent production companies such as BBC & ITV.

Whilst working in television she has created and developed a TV-specific employability business, Connect2TVCoaching providing clients with CV and cover letter writing consultations and mentoring as well as employability workshops, training and networking events. She has received great feedback in which clients have gained interviews and paid work placements at companies such as the BBC, Lime Pictures, Love Productions and other independent production companies as a result. A Ravensbourne Graduate in Content Creation and Broadcast & from a non-traditional background she is passionate about specifically engaging and empowering disadvantaged young people enabling them to develop both personally and professionally giving them the opportunity to gain paid employment within the industry. Qualified with a Level 3 Award in Education and Training she has delivered TV and Media specific employability workshops through Connect2TVCoaching.

One of Georgina’s treasured moments in her career thus far includes receiving her first award nomination under the category of Rising Talent at the Screen Nation Awards – a ceremony that celebrates diversity within film and television. In 2019 I worked as a Production Coordinator on a programme called Operation Live, The Open Heart Surgery: Uncut which has also been shortlisted under Live Event at the BAFTA’s.  She has also been nominated as a Rising Star at the We Are The City awards a ceremony for professional women.

Media Production Show 2019

WE’RE AT STAND 574

Come along to this year’s Media Production Show, say ‘hello’ and pick up your free swag.

Register for your free access and check out industry brands at the biggest event for technology and talent in the creative industries. The show will feature key exhibitors presenting their products and services that vary across pre-production, post and content distribution across two days. There will also be a programme of free high-calibre seminars with some of the biggest industry names sharing their inspirational insights and valuable knowledge.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

About Media Production Show:

Launched in 2016, The Media Production Show provides opportunities to meet and network with different exhibitors presenting their products and services that vary across pre-production, production, post and content distribution. 2019 is the year the event will be showcasing talent and technology across the creative industries… not a show to be missed!

The Media Production Show is hosted and organised by the publishers of market leading titles including Broadcast, Broadcast Intelligence, KFTV, The Knowledge, Production Intelligence and Screen International. We also have a highly successful track record in organising high-end conferences and industry awards, with a reputation for bringing the key players together, to debate the creative industries, network with each other and celebrate their successes.

We are excited to exhibit alongside our colleagues at:

  • Avid
  • Canon
  • JVC
  • Panasonic
  • …and many more
We look forward to seeing you there!

Concept vs Instinct: A Screenwriting Workshop with Award-Winner Corey Mandell

Come join us as award-winning writer Corey Mandell talks about his views on instinctive vs conceptual writing. He has written numerous projects for Ridley Scott, Harrison Ford, Meg Ryan, Julia Roberts, Warner Brothers, Universal, 20th Century Fox, Working Title, Walt Disney Pictures and many more.

Corey will:

  • Talk about the difference between ‘instinctive’ and ‘conceptual’ screenwriting
  • Give an idea of how he one doesn’t necessarily exclude the other
  • Share his experiences with working for high-end production companies and A-listers

Come along to this gem of an event, meet new people and get some insight into the ins and outs of the various ways to write for the big screen.

About Corey Mandell:

Corey Mandell is an award-winning playwright and screenwriter who has written projects for Ridley Scott, Wolfgang Petersen, Harrison Ford, Meg Ryan, Julia Roberts, John Travolta, Warner Brothers, Universal, 20th Century Fox, Fox 2000, Fox Family, Working Title, Paramount, Live Planet, Beacon Films, Touchstone, Trilogy, Radiant, Kopelson Entertainment and Walt Disney Pictures.

His Professional Screenwriting and Television Writing Workshops offer an alternative to the same old tired rules and formulas found in most screenwriting classes, books and seminars. This innovative program is the only one to teach creative integration, script testing, compelling conflict, organic story design, strategic rewriting and story mapping. With these tools, writers are able to create the pitch-perfect authentic scripts required to break into, and thrive in, the current marketplace.

In the past three years, graduates have gone on to sell or option scripts to Warner Brothers, Paramount, Sony Pictures, Disney, Fox, MGM, Universal, Showtime, FX, USA Network, NBC, HBO, MTV and AMC. Others have been staffed on such shows as Community, The Fosters, Jane the VirginBonesJustified, BoJack Horseman,Young and Hungry, PlayingHouse, The Mentalist, Marvel’s Agents of Shield, Up All Night, State of Affairs, Rosewood, The Leftovers, You’re the Worst, Pretty Little Liars, Treme, The Blacklist and The Leftovers.

The Workshops teach the essential skill sets required to write at a professional level, both for feature films and television. The classes are offered live in Los Angeles as well as online using video conferencing to allow participants to see and hear each other in real time. These highly popular classes draw students from across the US, Europe and Australia.

With the recent explosion of television pilots being bought, and a healthy rebound in the feature spec script market, there’s never been a better time to jump into the writing game. One script absolutely can change your life. But it’s got to be the right script. If you’re serious about developing the skills required to launch a career, these workshops can help take years off your learning curve and significantly increase your chances of success.

Selling Your Feature Film: Using a Proof of Concept

Come join us as writer/director Dwayne Gumbs will present the importance of having a proof of concept in order to sell your feature film script to investors. He will screen ‘Holy Beef’, a proof of concept for his feature film currently in development.

‘Holy Beef’ was funded through Film London’s London Calling scheme and was in official selection at the BFI London Film Festival 2018 and the London Short Film Festival 2019. As such, the project has also been supported by Film London as part of their Microwave scheme for first time feature filmmakers.

Dwayne will:

  • Talk about when and why the proof of concept became vital to his feature project
  • Give an idea of how to create a feasible and engaging a ‘short version’ of a substantial feature idea
  • Share his experiences of the benefits the proof of concept has brought with it and what it means for the future of his project

Come along to this gem of an event, meet new people and get some insight into the ins and outs of the journey from proof of concept to feature production.

About Dwayne Gumbs:

Dwayne’s passion for writing found an outlet as a child through Grime. Having grown up in East London when the culture was emerging, his hobbies included MCing, DJing and music production – a connection he’s maintained to this day. In 2008 he founded Diverse Voices Entertainment, a unique entity for young people to express themselves and access opportunities in the arts which would otherwise not be available to them. He has written and directed many live shows and short films, all co-created with these young people.

Dwayne collaborated with Iain Simpson on the Film London funded grime comedy short ‘Holy Beef’, a proof of concept for a feature in development, ‘Running Out of Grime’, which was also developed through Film London’s Microwave scheme.

Dwayne is passionate about creating positive depictions of a young generation too often portrayed negatively on screen. Whilst the London film industry is definitely broadening the range of stories being told, he still feels there is an unaddressed gap in the ‘Urban Film’ market, which is not a fair representation of the vibrant and positive inner city London life he experienced growing up, nor the true nature of today’s youth.