New Member Perk: Discount with Performance Film and Media Insurance

Hello everyone,

We have some exciting news to announce!

We have partnered with Performance Film and Media Insurance to provide our members with access to a variety of insurance options and with a  special discount for members.  Whether you are a freelancer, limited company, or short film to feature film, Performance has you covered.

 

Performance insures:

  • One off Productions whatever the size of budget – films / tv / commercials and more!
  • Production Companies
  • Post Production Companies
  • Freelancers (Filmmakers, Camera Operators, Sound recordists)
  • Equipment Hire companies
  • Studios
  • Animations

Members can find out how to take advantage of this discount by logging into the Members Section and then clicking on the Discounts page.

Stay tuned as we are working closely together with Michael Wood, Head of Film & Media, to provide our members with articles, videos, podcasts and more in learning about how to ensure you’re properly covered.

Bryan currently serves as the Chief Operating Officer of the International Moving Image Society (IMIS). Before coming to the UK in 2012, Bryan grew up in the mid-west US where he learned of his passion for telling interesting and inspiring stories. He has a desire to pass on the knowledge he has to anyone looking to further their skills or enter the industry.

The Media Production Show: Day 1 Highlights

This year the Media Production Show took place at London’s Olympia venue, its second edition falling in nicely with the start of the summer. Organized across a range of pop-up stalls, camera studios and platforms for the key interviewers, visitors were free to roam from stall to stall, networking, engaging and hearing about new developments in the industry.

With more than 100 speakers across the different panels–from The Missing’s writers and co-creators Harry and Jack Williams to Paul Machliss and his insightful points on editing on-set–the Media Production Show really came into its own in terms of style. Highlights of the show included kit and equipment exhibitions, networking opportunities, and masterclasses which covered everything from colouring, content, distribution forms and post-production. There really was something for everyone. From editors and VFX specialists working on features to camera operators and screenwriters working in television, the atmosphere was one of great optimism.

Day One of the show began on a positive note, kicking off with brothers Jack and Harry Williams’ keynote interview. Having co-written and produced (with no trace of sibling rivalry I might add) the award-winning series The Missing, the two provided continuous nuggets of knowledge for hopefuls just starting out. Their inspiration for writing, they explained, was conducive to constantly working and bouncing ideas off one another. They also talked about location scouting within a production, and that compromising on a location budget is not always necessary (If it’s a good idea, funding will be found). They also touched on the importance of being able to multitask and understand the business and financial decisions involved in launching your own creation into the unknown.

As Jack himself said, business was not something he had planned into the folds of a writing career; but in film–or TV–it’s a must. And what with their recent contract with All3 Media, it’s safe to say they know exactly what they’re talking about.  

Next up was the Editing Masterclass, delivered by Paul Machliss, editor of the well-known Scott Pilgrim vs the World and Baby Driver. What followed was the interesting analysis of his process for the latter, and how, given that the film relies on music to set the pace (main character Baby has tinnitus and requires the beat of his I-Pod music to get through his days), it was easier for Paul to carry out the editing on set. This way he could observe the rhythm as he went along. This tied in nicely with talks of current and new software, as he could work on set at the same time the footage was received. Editing, as he tells us in his own words,  is like telling a good joke: delivering the punchline depends (in a big way) on excellent timing.

Though a legend in the editing world now, Paul Machliss came from humble beginnings. He kickstarted his career as a runner at a television station in Melbourne, though he said this was punctuated by long periods of boredom and eventually frustration, as those around him were involved in the editing and he lingered on in the background. After moving to London and working on a documentary, however, he got his lucky break. He met Edgar Wright, who invited him to edit his series Spaced, and the rest, as he said with a modest smile, “is history”.  

Finally, I sat down to watch what would be my final interview of the day, the New Kings of Content seminar, featuring Alex Morris, Chris Bonney and Richard Chambers, CEOs of Barcroft Media, Cineflix and Zoomin’ TV respectively. This seminar explored new developments in video production, mostly the exploitation of rising opportunities online, and how young producers are commissioned to create short, punchy and true videos for the their young counterparts to enjoy.

Wandering from stall to stall, it became apparent how expanding and growing the media industry really is, particularly for young professionals. There are new developments to explore and exploit every day; whether it’s camera novelties, electronic designs or Youtubers new to the scene, it really is a great time to break into this industry.

Elena Alston is a script editor and content writer living in London. Recently graduated with an MA in creative writing at Brunel University, she specialises in screenplay editing and fantasy fiction, but also writes horror, sci-fi and satire.

The BKSTS Relaunches as the International Moving Image Society

London, UK, 7 November 2016

The British Kinematograph Sound and Television Society (BKSTS) is celebrating its 85th anniversary by rebranding and relaunching itself as the International Moving Image Society (IMIS).  The Society has seen the evolving nature of the industry and has decided this new brand is better aligned to address current changes in the industry as well as future developments.

The Society is not only looking towards encompassing traditional formats like feature films, television, short films, commercials, and music promos but also non-traditional formats such as virtual reality, interactive mediums, gaming, mobile video, web series and more.

In addition, the Society has laid out it’s aims to inspire, train, educate, and connect all members of the industry, whether at entry or professional level, around the world.  The Society plans on accomplishing this through its new website www.societyinmotion.com where it will develop original content for every phase of development from conception, through production, and all the way through exhibition and archiving.  Further, the Society plans to offer new seminars and events open to members and the public, training courses, opportunities for online and in-person networking, and expand its accreditation programme.  The Society aims on building a strong alliance with other societies, guilds and associations, both in the UK and around the world, in order to fulfil its mission.

The Society is best known for its series of monthly lectures covering all aspects of the industry ranging from technical to creative.  The Society has also had a rich history of providing wall charts that illustrate best-management practices for areas of the industry as well as technical resources.  The Society is a partner to Cinema Technology Magazine with members who regularly contribute to the publication.

 

About the BKSTS

The BKSTS is a non-profit member-based organisation that was formed in the late 1920s as the ‘London Branch’ of the Society of Motion Picture Engineers (now known as SMPTE) until 1930 when it split to form its own organisation.  In 1931 the Society began by accrediting the London Polytechnic (now the University of Westminster) in 1932.  It has grown and evolved over time to meet the changes of the industry such as the shift from employment to freelancing as well as film to digital.  It is in this respect that the Society has decided to evolve itself again into the International Moving Image Society.  The Society has members in over 20 countries and plans to expand its base to many more.

The Society at IBC 2016

The International Moving Image Society will be at IBC Stand 6.B01.  We will have copies of Cinema Technology on the stand and some furniture for members to use.  We will be sending two representatives on behalf of the Society to roam the floor, engage with other vendors, and promote the Society.  Please feel free to contact us at bryan.cook@societyinmotion.com if you would like to meet to discuss anything.