Stitch – The New Generation of Talent Management

Hello Everyone,

We have some exciting news to announce!

We have partnered with Stitch to give members a 20% discount on your first year of Stitch. Stitch is a new tool to help companies store, manage and stay up to date with their black book, and has been designed in partnership with several leading production companies.

As budgets and timings are squeezed, and the production world is faced with unprecedented change, your network has never been a more important resource. Yet most companies are still storing their black book of directors, DoPs, crew, freelancers and creatives in spreadsheets and scribbled notes. Stitch is here to change that, and make sure you’re getting the most from your black book.

 

An example of what your black book might look like on Stitch

 

Stitch – stitchapp.co – is the complete solution for your black book storage, access and management – helping you to save time and supercharge your network. With all of your contacts in one centralised database, you can leave notes against contacts, attach files and see people’s latest work pulled in live from websites, YouTube and Vimeo. Smart search and easy tags mean you can then easily filter your network to find the right talent at a seconds notice.

If that’s not enough, Stitch comes with inbuilt tools to help you grown your network, manage your inbound applications, create shortlists of talent to share with your team and track your people-based workflows.

An example of managing your people-based workflows on Stitch

 

Members can find out how to take advantage of this discount by logging into the Members Section and then clicking on the Discounts page.

Company plans for Stitch start at £40 per month.

Bryan currently serves as the Chief Operating Officer of the International Moving Image Society (IMIS). Before coming to the UK in 2012, Bryan grew up in the mid-west US where he learned of his passion for telling interesting and inspiring stories. He has a desire to pass on the knowledge he has to anyone looking to further their skills or enter the industry.

How to Nework

A solid network is an ideal foundation for a career that’s going places.

In this fast-paced industry, a good network is essential. With more and more people working freelance or on short-term contracts, jobs are often given to contacts. Your peers will also keep you up to date with the latest trends and teach you about how your industry works. Networking can also give you ideas for projects and exciting career paths.

This is why the International Moving Image Society puts great emphasis on networking. All of its events offer networking opportunities and the smaller IMIS communities groups are perfect for getting and staying in touch with like-minded people.

It’s worth keeping in mind that the secret to good networking is not to perfect your sales pitch, but to build mutually beneficial relationships, which is also much more enjoyable. Here are eight tips that will help you build a network that will work for you.

Nurture your contacts

Whether these are your mates from uni, former colleagues, friends of friends or university professors, try to stay in touch – that could be just by connecting on LinkedIn or other social media, or meeting up for the occasional drink, chatting about projects and news in the industry.

Go to industry events

Any work-related events, such as discussions, workshops, union gatherings, trade fairs or seminars can be brilliant opportunities to nurture old contacts and make new ones. It’s easiest to meet new people at events for professionals, as many people will come on their own. It’s much harder to network at social events, such as private views or parties, where most people arrive with a group of colleagues or friends.

Consider going to networking events

Have a look for relevant networking events on www.eventbrite.com. While some comprise members of all industries, others target specific professional fields. Although entering a room full of strangers can be intimidating, these events are designed to make it as easy as possible to get chatting. Some networking events follow a programme, where members meet a set number of people (a bit like speed dating), while others are less structured.

Introduce yourself

The easiest way to get going, is to just introduce yourself to somebody standing on their own. You can also wait until somebody approaches you, which often happens very quickly. Think of a brief introduction beforehand. It needs to explains in a couple of sentences who you are and what you are looking for. For example ‘I’m [your name] and am looking to expand my network’, or ‘I’m [your name] and work as [job title]. I’m now looking for my next career move’, or ‘My name is [your name]. I’m a film graduate, looking for opportunities within TV’.

A couple of sentences at a time is often all people can take in at a busy and noisy event, so keep your introduction to a minimum and start asking about their work.

Focus on building rapport

When you’re chatting to someone, focus on having a good conversation and finding common ground, rather than just giving a presentation. Try and find out what your new contact does and is looking for, regardless if they’re a movie producer or assistant – you never know who can connect you with just the right person. Explain what would help you in your career, but also find out what their goals are. Share sources, experience, advice and offer to connect them with other people in your network. It’s not only lovely to help others, but they’ll be happy to return the favour.

Keep it brief

Once you feel you’ve had a good chat (or if the conversation doesn’t get going), ask for their card, tell them how nice it was to meet them and offer to stay in touch, before moving on. It’s often best to keep it brief. If you’ve started discussing a possible project, or there is something both of you would like to talk about in more depth, arranging to meet up again is often better than to spend all evening talking to the same person.

Follow up

Always follow up with a LinkedIn contact request and message or email. Making introductions can also be very helpful and is an excellent way of making a positive impression. If relevant, try to meet up with your new contacts, suggest ideas or send your CV.

Stay in touch

Even with the best intentions, most people will forget the majority of people they meet at networking events, unless they make an effort to stay in touch. If you want to considered for that perfect work opportunity a few months’ down the line, you need to remind them of your existence.

How you do this, depends very much on each contact as well as the field you work in, but again, the best way is trying to be genuinely helpful. Make introductions, share relevant professional information or forward work and funding opportunities. The occasional email can work as well, and many swear by interacting with your contacts on social media, such as LinkedIn.

Stick with it

Building a good network takes time. It’s a skill, and the more you do it, the better you will get. You will also find the style of making and nurturing contacts that works best for you. And remember, that you will never know when you will meet the person, who will put your career on a new trajectory.

Sonia Klug is a freelance writer, editor and news junkie, who has written about the media and imaging technology for nearly two decades. She is particularly interested in the impact of new technologies on us and how it’s changing our working lives.

www.londonwriter.co.uk

Six Ways Film & Television is Embracing Women and BAME

 

The most prominent debate in film and television in the present day is the representation of women and BAME. In this article, I hope to present schemes and organisations that are dedicated to creating diversity and equality in the industry.

 

ONE: NFTS Directing Workshop

The National Film and Television School provides teaching and training for those wishing to work in film and television. They run several diplomas; masters; certificates and short courses.

This new initiative for directors has been launched by NFTS aiming to increase the number of women, BAME and people with disabilities.

The six selected directors will take part in a 2-day introduction in March followed by an intensive 4-week workshop during summer culminating in the production of a short film.

The course is free and the deadline is 19th February.

Apply here: https://nfts.co.uk/directing-workshop

 

 

TWO: CREATIVE ACCESS

Founded in 2012, Creative Access aims to provide young BAME people paid training opportunities in creative companies and supporting them into full-time employment.

With over 200 media partners offering opportunities including ITV, BBC, Channel 4 and many more. This organisation is paving the way to creating an industry that truly reflects British society.

Want to sign up? Check out the website here: https://creativeaccess.org.uk/

 

THREE: Women In Film & TV UK Mentoring Scheme

Women In Film & TV is a membership organisation run by women supporting women working in the creative media in the UK.

Every year they run a mentoring scheme designed for women with more than 5 years’ experience looking to take a significant step in their career. Over six months participants receive six hours of mentoring contact with an industry figure. There are also seminars, training workshops and networking opportunities.

Free to apply and participate. Find out more here: https://wftv.org.uk/mentoring/

FOUR: BAFTA

In 2019, BAFTA will be adding the BFI Diversity Standards to the eligibility criteria for the Outstanding British Film Award and Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer.

This decision has been controversial in the industry with some parties believing this is a step too far and restricts filmmaking. In my opinion, it is a bold and much needed move towards creating an inclusive and equal industry. My only issue with it, is the fact this is even needed in the 21st Century to promote diverse filmmaking.

Considering that in the 2015 Oscars no non-white actors were nominated for an Academy Award, a change in criteria for these awards is definitely overdue.

FIVE: DIRECTORS UK

In 2016, Directors UK released a 10 year study on women directors in film revealing the shocking truth that only 13.6% of all directors working in the last decade were women.

They aim to use the findings of this study to improve the industry for women by campaigning for these 3 specific goals:

  1. 50% of films backed by UK-based public funding bodies to be directed by women by 2020.
  2. Development of the Film Tax Credit Relief system to require all UK films to take account of diversity.
  3. Industry wide campaign to inform and influence change

Find out more here: https://www.directors.uk.com/campaigns/gender-equality-in-uk-film-industry#support-our-campaign

 

SIX: GAME CHANGERS

In 2016, BFI Film Forever and Creative Skillset launched a workshop called Game Changers specifically for women and BAME filmmakers.

Run by Kymberlie Andrews who is a master trainer and communication coach. The aim of the two day workshop was to boost confidence; teach pitching and make contacts with like minded individuals.

For myself, this workshop changed my game by opening my eyes to my personality strengths which has affirmed by future career goal.

Hopefully this opportunity will be renewed for 2017 but only time can tell!

Find out more here: http://gamechangeruk.com/

 

If you know of any opportunities for women and BAME in film and TV then please comment below!

 

 

 

Aspiring TV Producer and Director currently studying at University of Greenwich doing a BSc Digital Film Production.
Working as a freelance production runner, office runner and floor runner.